Monthly Archives: April 2018

School choice and competition: In Bay County’s Lynn Haven, Mosley High School beats the charter competition hands down.

Like it or not, competition between traditional district schools and charter schools is a feature of education life in many Florida communities. Bay County’s City of Lynn Haven is one of those communities.  The city’s traditional district high school, Mosley … Continue reading

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Why Florida’s physics educators should care when a Silicon Valley high school drops physics

When a Florida high school drops physics, it’s a dog-bites-man story – unlikely to get anyone other than me and perhaps a local teacher or two excited.  After all, physics enrollments in Florida’s public high schools have declined 8% over … Continue reading

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As many as four FSU Physics grads will be entering high school teaching next year – but they are bypassing the College of Education

As many as four new graduates of the FSU Physics Department will be teaching in Florida high schools next year.  That’s a big number.  In the 2016-2017 academic year, only nine physics departments nationwide placed more new graduates into high … Continue reading

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Young Catholics are leaving the Church because they think that Church teaching on cosmology and evolution is in conflict with science, even though it’s not. How can this problem be fixed?

I wrote the piece below on (approximately) the tenth anniversary of the adoption of Florida’s K-12 science standards and the publication of my article about my experience on the standards committee in America Magazine.  I submitted this piece to America, … Continue reading

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Why Florida should make math and science a high priority: A response to Billy Townsend

Polk County School Board member Billy Townsend and I are continuing a dialogue about how Florida’s K-12 system would best serve the state’s kids.  This is a response to Billy’s most recent response, “What is Algebra? And is it memorable … Continue reading

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2017 NAEP: Florida starts to turn the Titanic in middle school math, but still much work to do.

Florida has started to turn around its student learning in middle school math, according to results from the 2017 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) released today (coverage from the Orlando Sentinel here). The state’s 8th grade math results, which plunged in … Continue reading

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Chemistry enrollments in Florida’s district high schools have dropped 9% in two years

Fall 2017 chemistry enrollments in Florida’s district high schools are 9% lower than they were in Fall 2015, according to data available from the Florida Department of Education. The enrollment numbers used here exclude dual enrollment courses, which are no … Continue reading

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This is the group of instructors that has carried me through my Studio Physics course this semester. And they are showing why we need to be face-to-face with our students to have the best outcomes.

The four instructors in the picture above have carried me through my second semester calculus-based Studio Physics course this semester.  They are (from left):  Undergraduate Learning Assistant Kirsty Scott, Department Teaching Lab Coordinator Barbara Reyes, Graduate Teaching Assistant Lakshmi Bhaskaran … Continue reading

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Board of Governors Chair Lautenbach responded to my Orlando Sentinel op-ed about online science instruction. Here is my response to him.

My Orlando Sentinel critique of the State University’s System’s drive to expand online science instruction prompted a rebuttal from Board of Governors Chair Ned Lautenbach.  Here I respond to the arguments he made in his piece. According to the Board … Continue reading

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Member of the Florida Board of Governors responds to my Orlando Sentinel op-ed “State’s push for online studies will hurt STEM students”

Ned Lauterbach, a member of the Florida Board of Governors, responds to my op-ed on online STEM learning in tomorrow morning’s Orlando Sentinel. Lauterbach doesn’t actually address my arguments about boosting student learning and serving underrepresented populations.  It’s likely he has … Continue reading

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