Monthly Archives: August 2015

Florida should replace its present high school testing program with the ACT. Here’s how Florida’s high school graduating class of 2015 did on the ACT.

It’s a real possibility that Florida could replace at least part of its high school testing program with the SAT or ACT, so yesterday’s release of state-by-state ACT results for the high school graduating class of 2015 is of particular … Continue reading

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Dismantling Florida’s statewide standardized testing program: It could really happen, according to an article in Politico

Travis Pillow from redefinEDonline deserves a hat tip for tweeting about the Politico article quoted here. When Seminole County Superintendent of Schools Walt Griffin tossed out a suggestion that Florida abandon its present statewide standardized testing program and instead use … Continue reading

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What do Pinellas County’s “Failure Factories” tell us about the Florida Best and Brightest Teacher Scholarship Program?

Pinellas County is preparing to tackle the problems of the five south county elementary schools that have been labeled “Failure Factories” by the Tampa Bay Times by designating several of those schools as magnet schools.  But the magnet school scheme has limits, … Continue reading

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Former American Physical Society Education Committee Chair blasts hit Big Bang Theory TV show! (And more about the Future Physicists of Florida effort in the Florida Keys)

Of course, that former committee chair is me. Starting with my comments on the Big Bang Theory TV show and how it perpetuates stereotypes about physicists, Michael Quirk at the Key West Citizen did a really nice job describing what the … Continue reading

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AIR Vice President says “S” should be dropped from STEM. Is he hatin’ on physics?

Mark Schneider, a Vice President and Institute Fellow at the American Institutes for Research, argued on the AIR’s InformED blog that bachelors’ degrees in science do not lead to high salaries, and so we need to drop the “S” from … Continue reading

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Monroe County Schools – poised to go from “good to great” – prepare for a physics push

The Monroe County School District, which placed 8th in the Orlando Sentinel’s math and science rankings and is 11th in Florida in high school physics-taking rate, is preparing a push to improve further, or to go from “good to great” in the words … Continue reading

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How the “Seminole Solution” to fix Florida’s overtesting problem could make high school science education better

Seminole County’s education leaders are pushing a plan to replace many of Florida’s statewide standardized tests with national tests in an effort to address overtesting and the technical problems that plagued the state’s move to put many of its tests … Continue reading

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In the education system, there is no substitute for numbers to make a point, but networks of relationships determine whether anything gets accomplished

When it comes to making a point, there is no substitute for numbers. Last week’s Tampa Bay Times story about five elementary schools where black children are sent to die academically relies on numbers about the schools’ racial makeup and … Continue reading

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Response to an Orlando Sentinel letter-writer: Yes, high schools should offer a balanced education – arts, humanities, social science, math, natural sciences. But they don’t yet.

On the Wednesday after the Orlando Sentinel published its Math and Science Rankings, and the day after the same paper published a strongly worded editorial arguing for the improvement of math and science education, the paper published a letter from a … Continue reading

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The updated Physics District Index: What it tells you is whether your district and school leaders think physics is important

Connor Oswald has updated the Physics District Index for the February 2015 enrollment counts and to include AICE and IB physics courses.  The results are shown below. But the story is the same:  If a district’s leadership and the principals … Continue reading

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