Monthly Archives: April 2016

The tough message about taking high school chemistry, physics, precalculus and calculus: Some statistics

Why should STEM advocates take responsibility for the tough message that college-bound students should take chemistry, physics, precalculus and calculus in high school? The results of a 2007 study of Florida’s high school graduating class of 1999 by researchers at … Continue reading

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STEM advocates must have the guts to deliver the tough message to students and parents about taking chemistry, physics, precalculus and calculus in high school

During a visit with parents and students at Panama City’s Mosley High School on Tuesday evening, I started my discussion with this assertion:  Every college-bound student should be prepared to choose any major. That is, every student arriving on a … Continue reading

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Courage and cowardice in educational decision-making

What separates scholars from bureaucrats is that scholars stand by their own research and beliefs. I happen to be a scholar, but in a very important way it doesn’t matter that I am.  I am a tenured full professor, and … Continue reading

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More on large lecture classes from Senators Negron and Bean

This might turn out to be a good two years for college science teaching reform.  In addition to the statement by incoming Senate President Negron at UF on Tuesday, there was also this on Tuesday at UNF, as reported by … Continue reading

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Incoming President of the Florida Senate not a fan of large lecture classes

From the account by the Gainesville Sun of Senator Joe Negron’s visit to the University of Florida yesterday during his “listening tour” of the state’s public universities: The classes are too large at UF.  There are too many freshmen and sophomores in … Continue reading

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Death of the Lecture Hall, Part 2

Originally posted on Bridge to Tomorrow:
Do students learn more in a physics MOOC than in a traditional lecture class?  An MIT study says yes (some), but the same study says that “interactive engagement pedagogy” like the SCALE-UP model used…

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The Death of the Lecture Hall

Originally posted on Bridge to Tomorrow:
With the advent of MOOC’s and other technological means of beaming non-interactive lectures to students, does it make any sense to spend scarce public resources building new $5 million 500-seat lecture halls at state-supported…

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