Monthly Archives: December 2017

Do physics majors apply and go to law school? Yes – and they lead the way on the LSAT.

Do physics majors go to law school?  Yes, and they do well on the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). The Law School Admissions Council (LSAC) compiles LSAT results for different majors, and occasionally an organization like the American Institute of … Continue reading

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Strong Schools v. Florida State Board of Education: Court decision whiffs on an important point.

Early in its opinion upholding a lower court ruling to dismiss the “adequacy suit” in which the plaintiffs claimed that Florida was not meeting its constitutional obligation to educate the state’s students properly, the First District Court of Appeals said … Continue reading

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2017: A visual guide to the year in math and science education in Florida’s high schools

In 2017, Florida continued to be below average in preparing its students for college majors in STEM fields.  A dramatic increase in the numbers of 8th and 9th graders passing the spring administration of the state’s Algebra 1 end-of-course exam … Continue reading

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The toughest sort of accountability for high school teachers: I see what your students can do.

In a studio physics classroom, I get to know students relatively well.  I know where they went to high school.  I often know who their physics teachers are.  And of course I can see with a high degree of precision … Continue reading

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Exodus from Florida public schools predicted before 2008 science standards adoption never materialized

Nearly a decade ago – on February 19, 2008 – Florida’s State Board of Education adopted new science standards for the K-12 schools that explicitly included biological evolution by a narrow 4-3 vote. Just before the vote, ten individuals opposing … Continue reading

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Legislative committee hosts discussion of tax credit scholarship program: Prospects for safety and financial oversight reform, but not for academic issues

Panelists at yesterday’s meeting of the PreK-12 Innovation Committee of the Florida House of Representatives suggested that the state should invest in improving oversight of safety and financial issues in the Tax Credit Scholarship Program.  However, they resisted academic reforms, … Continue reading

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Why the “graduate student tax” being considered by Congress is an awful idea

FSU graduate student Brittany Fuzia decided while she was still in high school that she wanted to be a research physicist. Brittany’s family had moved from school to school in different parts of the nation. Finally she graduated from East … Continue reading

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