With chemistry, physics and calculus, a high school student is ready for any college major. How is your district doing in calculus?

According to the American Society for Engineering Education, high school courses in chemistry, physics and calculus provide a strong foundation for a college engineering major.  Those courses also provide strong preparation for college majors in math, computer science, statistics, physics, health professions, the life sciences and chemistry.

So a student who has strong high school learning experiences in chemistry, physics and calculus is ready for any college major.  (OK, not a music performance major.  But you know what I mean.)

But finding math teachers who are strong enough in math themselves to comfortably teach calculus is difficult.  Check the job postings for your district.  How many open positions are there for teachers who can handle calculus?  And there’s no evidence that situation is improving.

But districts that make calculus a priority for their high schools find a way.  The ranking of districts shown below tells you which districts take this imperative most seriously.

As usual, the data come from the Florida Department of Education.  The calculus enrollments include Honors Calculus, which I’ve been known to grump about in the past.

calculus_rate

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One Response to With chemistry, physics and calculus, a high school student is ready for any college major. How is your district doing in calculus?

  1. Pingback: Giving college-bound students the STEM career option: Which Florida districts do it best? | Bridge to Tomorrow

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