Siemens CEO in the Atlanta Journal Constitution: STEM a “a ticket back to the kind of prosperity that used to define the American economy”

From the Atlanta Journal Consitution, by Siemens CEO Eric Spiegel:

At our company, we employ thousands of scientists and engineers. But our salespeople also need to have enough of a technical background to discuss the merits of our products with expertise. Our marketers need to be fluent in the language of medicine, energy, and high-tech manufacturing. None of these jobs are what you would typically think of as STEM-fields, yet today, all of them require a STEM background.

But STEM isn’t just a ticket to a good job. It’s also a ticket back to the kind of prosperity that used to define the American economy.

Take a look at the piece for more good stuff.

About these ads
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Siemens CEO in the Atlanta Journal Constitution: STEM a “a ticket back to the kind of prosperity that used to define the American economy”

  1. Doc Carr says:

    An interesting point. My uncle went from being a civil engineer selling Armco steel pipe to a consultant with McKinsey and Company and an independent entrepreneur in the tech sector.

    The problem is that those jobs pay a LOT more than being a regular engineer, which is why engineers can be seen switching into higher paying (and easier) professions like finance.

    I notice that he did not address the central issue of the ratio between his pay and that of the people who make his company run, which has changed radically in the last 30 years, nor the issue of the vicious attacks on teachers who dare to suggest that higher pay might improve science and math teaching in K-12. In a nation that expresses many of its values in monetary form, mere words about valuing certain skills can have limited impact and can be un-done when students hear their math and science role models — teachers — attacked daily by politicians.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s